Paillard refers to a slice or piece of meat (chicken, veal, beef) that has been pounded very thinly or until it is thin and grilled or sautéed. Examples: Paillard di Vitello, Paillard de Beouf and Paillard di Veau Paillard is the French word describing a piece of meat or fish that has been pounded very thinnly which is used for sauteing and grilling. Paillard is a method of preparing meat that involves flattening it. This not only shortens the cooking times considerably, but also tenderises the meat. The meat prepared in this way can be cooked and served in any way, but due to the tenderness and thinness of the meat it is particularly suitable for steaming.

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