Shochu refers to the Japanese low-class distilled spirits, made from rice, corn or wheat. It is distilled as compared to Sake which is brewed. Moreover, as compared to Sake (12 - 15\% alcohol volume), Shochu is much stronger, usually about 35 or 40\% alcohol volume. It is the cheapest drink in Japan as measured by its alcohol content, only about the same as price or cost of Sake
Other definition:
Shochu refers to a traditional Japanese distilled beverage. Shochu is Japan's other indigenous alcoholic beverage, but unlike sake, shochu is distilled. It is also made from one of several raw materials. The alcoholic content is usually 25\%, although sometimes it can be as high as 42\% or more.

Related Articles

Zivania ■■■■■■■
Zivania refers to the traditional alcoholic beverage which has been produced for centuries in Cyprus . . . Read More
Mochi ■■■■■■■
Mochi is a traditional Japanese rice cake made from glutinous rice that has been pounded into a sticky . . . Read More
Whiskey ■■■■■■■
Whiskey is a distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Various grains (which may be . . . Read More
Punsch ■■■■■■■
Punsch refers to a Swedish sweet, yellow alcoholic drink. Punsch also refers to Danish strong liqueur . . . Read More
Sekihan ■■■■■■
Sekihan is the Japanese dish made of sticky rice cooked with azuki, or red bean, which gives the rice . . . Read More
Satoo ■■■■■■
Satoo refers to a traditional Indian drink that is popular in the interiors of Punjab. Satoo can be made . . . Read More
Baumkuchen ■■■■■
Baumkuchen refers to one of the many traditional cakes from Germany, a German Tree Cake. It is a layered . . . Read More
Nispola ■■■■■
Nispola refers to a Spanish exotic fruit found inland, along the fertile Tropical Valley where orange . . . Read More
Kanten ■■■■■
Kanten is the Japanese for "agar agar", a jelly-like substancethat is extracted from red algae. Agar . . . Read More
Nanohana / Na No Hana ■■■■■
Nanohana / Na No Hana: Nanohana or Na No Hana (Brassica campestris) is the Japanese name for rape blossomare . . . Read More