Tokwa is a Filipino term that refers to firm /pressed soy bean curd. In the Philippines, Tokwa is famous for being fried and mix with "cubed and boiled baboy"(pig meat or pig ears) called Tokwa't Baboy.

Tokwa is a good Substitute for meat for a complete vegetarian dish.

Below is a Picture of raw Tokwa which can be found in almost all wet markets (Palengke) in the Philippines and most big supermarkets selling foodstuffs.

We call this Tokwa, soya bean curd. used for sauteeing with other vegetables to replace meat. Nice for frying and serve with delicious sauce made from soya sauce, vinegar, chopped red onions, minced garlic and Siling Labuyo (chilies) called Tokwa´t Baboy
Tokwa / Soy Bean Curd

Related Articles

Sitaw ■■■■■■■
Sitaw is a Filipino word for String Beans. It is also sometimes also called Long Beans. Sitaw is one . . . Read More
Pata Tim ■■■■■■■
Pata Tim refers stewed or braised pork leg, a Chinese-influenced Filipino dish. The pork leg is stewed . . . Read More
Repolyo ■■■■■■
Repolyo is the Filipino word for "Cabbage". It is from the Spanish word "Repollo" which also refers to . . . Read More
Namul ■■■■■■
Namul is a Korean term meaning "vegetables" or "wild greens" dishes. Namul refers to a traditional Korean . . . Read More
Giniling na baboy ■■■■■
Giniling na baboy is a Filipino term for minced or ground pork. Giniling na baboy can be used in making . . . Read More
Tales ■■■■■
Tales is Indonesian word for "Taro" which is also commonly known as Elephant ear or Dasheen. There are . . . Read More
Sisig ■■■■■
Sisig refers to a Filipino food which said to be originated from Pampanga is made from roasted pig's . . . Read More
Bubur Cha Cha ■■■■■
Bubur Cha Cha refers to one of Malaysia's popular dessert which is cooked with yam, sweet potatos, bananas, . . . Read More
Mock Duck ■■■■■
Mock Duck refers to a fresh, organic wheat gluten that is folded and pressed creating a meat substitute . . . Read More
Soybean at top500.de■■■■■
The soybean (US) or soya bean (UK) is a species of legume native to East Asia, widely grown for its edible . . . Read More