Naivedyam also called Nipun son Naivedhya refer to the food prepared for the Gods in Temples in India. It is cooked in accordance with the sastras, by traditional methods, in a separate kitchen inside the Temple. The cooking is mainly done by the priests and tasting of the food when it is prepared and eating the food before it is offered is forbidden The content of the Naivedyam varies according to the Gods and regions. It is served two or three times a day in Temples, according to the specified regional custom. Moreover, Naivedyam which is a Sanskrit word which means supplication refers to food offering to Hindu deities as part of a worship ritual.

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