- Ofé Onugbo (Ndole) : Ofé Onugbo also called Bitter Leaf Soup refers to a soup prepared with the freshly squeezed or dried leaves of the ever green plant called Vernonia amygdaline. Bitter leaf soup is popularly eaten by the Igbo speaking people of Eastern Nigeria, and the people of Cameroon. It is called Ofé Onugbo by the Igbos, the Cameroonians call it Ndolé. There is regional variation in how this soup is prepared, as always.Like most other African soups, this authentic African soup is prepared with fish, meat, snail, either in combination or singly, with added spices and other condiments. Bitter leaf soup or Ofé Onugbo (Ndole ) can be eaten or served with pounded yam or Semolina or Eba.

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