Deutsch: Reis
Rice is the seed of the monocot plants Oryza sativa (Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima (African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia.

Rice is a staple food grain that is widely consumed around the world. It is a cereal grain that is processed and eaten as a staple food in many countries. Rice is usually boiled or steamed, and served as a side dish or as an ingredient in various dishes, such as stews, salads, and soups.

Examples of dishes that use rice include:

Different cultures have their own unique ways of cooking and serving rice.

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