Job's tears refers to an ancient grain prized throughout Africa and Asia. It is black, shaped like a teardrop, and has a sweet flavor. Job's tear is commonly used in Asia as food and medicine. In China, it is one the most popular food herbs used in the diet therapy of painful and stiff joints, either singly or in soup mixes. Job's tear is also commonly known as Chinese pearl barley in America. After an hour or more of cooking, it taste like the common barley. However, it is different in many respects from the regular barley. The latter does not have the reputed effects of Job's tear. In Korea, it is made into Yulmucha or Yumul Tea (Job's tears tea).

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