Glossary S

The food glossary +++ 'Sampinit', 'Sarciadong Hiwas', 'Siomai'
Streuselkuchen is a German yeast cake that is topped with cinnamon-sugar crumble.

Strip steak is another term for New York steak . Strip steak is a beef steak cut from a boneless loin.

Stock Cubes mean Bouillon cubes in Great Britain.

Soljanka also known as Solyanka or Solianka refers to a Russian thick spicy soup containing fish, meat or mushrooms. Pickled cucumbers are used in the dish and also cabbage, cream, dill and mushrooms.

Sake is a Japanese beverage which is fermented from rice, a kind of grain, hence, it made Sake more of a beer than a wine. However, Sake is not carbonated, and flavor-wise is closer to wine than beer, although it is quite unqiue on its own and so different from wine. Sake is not a distilled beverage, and is not even remotely related to Gin, Vodka or other spirits There are different types of Sake based on taste and flavor, namely: (1) Amakuchi - Sake which has a sweet flavor (2) Futsu-shu Sake - is a normal Sake. (3) Genshu - is undiluted Sake. Most Sakes are slightly diluted (4) Ginjo-shu - is Sake brewed with rice milled so that no more than 60% of the grain remains (5) Hi-ire - Pasteurization (6) Honjozo - Sake to which a small amount of distilled alcohol is added (7) Jizake - is Sake from smaller Kura -- originally, Sake from the boonies (8) Junmai-shu - Sake brewed with only rice, water, and Koji and no additives added (9) Karakuchi - sake which is dry in flavor (10) Kasu - The lees remaining after the sake has been pressed from the fermenting mixture (11) Koji is the rice into which Koji-jin has been propogated (12) Koji-kin or Koji-kabi - it is Aspergillus Oryzae, a starch dissolving mold Kura refers to a Sake brewery. It is also known as Sakagura Kurabito is a Sake brewery worker. Kuramoto is the Head of the Sake brewery Toji is the Head brewer at a Kura Meigara is a brand name of Sake Moromi refers to the fermenting mixture of rice, water, Koji, and yeast which yields Sake Moto is the yeast starter of a batch of Sake. Moto is also called Shubo Nihonshu-do is the specific gravity of a Sake. An indication of dryness or sweetness of Sake Seimai means rice polishing or milling Seimai-buai is the degree to which rice has been polished before brewing Seishu is the officiall name for Sake as far as taxes are concerned Shochu is a traditional Japanese distilled beverage Shubo is the yeast starter for a batch of Sake

Saag is an Indian term meaning "green vegetable ". Saag or Palak dishes are spiced purees of spinach or other greens common in Northern India. Saag often contain additional ingredients such as potatoes, fresh cheese , chicken or chickpeas to make a more substantial dish. To make a more tasty and nourishing meal, Saag must be eaten with Chapati or Naan. Some of the popular vareities of Saag are: 1. Paalak Paneer (Spinach and fried cubes of Indian cheese) which has also 2 varieties: - Mughalai/Shahi Paalak Paneer may have Khoya - Makhani/Buttery Paalak Paneer may have heavy cream 2. Saag Wala Ghosht (Mutton with either Mustard greens or Spinach) Mustard green are common in Indian homes. Spinach is used in the restaurants for convenience. 3. Sarson ka Saag (Mustard greens) 4. Makhani Paalak (Buttery Spinach)