Glossary I

- Ichimi (Chili Pepper) : Ichimi Chili Pepper refers to a kind/type/variety of Asian Chili that is most commonly used in Japanese cooking. Ichimi is small, very hot, and red in color. It is available fresh, dried, flakes, or ground as a seasoning for a variety of dishes. Ichimi is also known as Togarashi Chili Pepper .

Isitambu refers to one of the dishes found in Durban, South Africa which is made of beans mixed with Samp . Cooking Isitambu requires patience as it needs plenty of cooking-hours before Isitambu is ready to be serve. Durban is the largest city in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Durban is regarded as the busiest port in Africa and is also a major centre of tourism.

Iscas is a term in Brazil that refers to appetizers. In Portugal, Iscas refer to calves' livers which are thinly sliced usually well prepared and sauteed with onion.

Icefish refers to rainbow "Smelt". various small round oily silver coloured seawater fish with a flavor similar to trout.

Imifino refer to wild spinach-like greens or to wild growing herbaceous plants that are collected and cooked as pot-herbs in South Africa. Some tribes eat Imifino with hot chilis for a more tasty vegetable dish. Moreover, Imifino is also fried up with onion, spices and perhaps a bit of chilli, and usually served with Pap or Putu Greens refer to any of various leafy plants or their leaves and stems eaten as vegetables.

Ital Food refers to the food of the Rastafarians, a vegetarian cuisine that does not make use of salt. The red, green and gold Rasta colors on dining establishments serves as a clue to locating Ital restaurants serving Ital Food. Ital food is derived from the word "vital food" (Self-determination of the black race resulted in the Rastafarians usage of the word 'I" to replace the first letter of many words). Ital food means it is natural, pure and clean food. For a Rastafarian it means no salt, no chemicals, no flesh, no blood, no whites (called whiteblood), no alcohol, no cigarettes and no drugs (herbsare not considered drugs). Rastafarians avoid salt, oil and meat. Their dietary laws are similar to the laws followed by Jews in Leviticus 11. Fish must be less than a foot long. No shell fish or fish without scales. Pork is especially condemned amongst Rastafarians. It is so important to not put the wrong thing in your body that some Rastafarians never cook in aluminum pots as it is said to leave traces of metal in the food that can get in your body. Cooking in a clay pot is popular among Rastafarians. Rastafarians see their food as a way to be one with nature and also as medicine for the body, as it builds your "strucha" (Patois or the word structure). There are also strict hygienic laws that Rastafarians follow. Natural food and drinks called 'Ital' food by Rastafarians has influenced Jamaica's culinary arts.