Glossary N

The food glossary +++ 'Nilagang mais', 'Naejangtang', 'Ngu vi huong'
Nutria refers to a large semi-aquatic rodent that is indigenous to South America which has become one of the food sources for people of Louisiana. Nutria was imported into Louisiana for its fur industry, however, over decades Nutria extensively damaged the state’s coastal wetlands, so officials decided to promote Nutria as a cheap and readily available food source.

Nane Sangak refers to Iranian fresh yeast bread, baked on hot stones and eaten while still warm. Nane Sangak is also known as Sangak.

Nanohana or Na No Hana (Brassica campestris) is the Japanese name for rape blossom; are rapeseed plants which are widely eaten as spring greens in Japan. Boiled Nanohana plants are dressed with Karashi mustard dressing. Use tender nanohana plants with flower buds. The nanohana plant is entirely edible, and the plant it is also the source of healthy Canola oil. Nanohana is a springtime flower, and in some areas of Japan you can find fields of the flower formed into mazes so visitors can wander through the blossoms and enjoy their beauty. Nanohana bloom just before sakura here in Japan, so they are kind of a prelude to spring, even though they are beautiful in their own right. Nanohana, in Japanese literally translates into 'Vegetable Flower' but it also can be read to mean wild flower, or flower of the field. the plant is completely edible. March, is the Nanohana season for most of Japan.Nanohana in Japan are also celebrated in the art and culture of Japan, such as in clothing patterns, souvenir books, toys, gift arrangements, candles, and a Nano Hana sweet traditionally made with azuki beans available in the early spring at many Japanese markets which look like Nanohana flowers. Nanohana is called Hanana in Kyoto.

Nam Pla Phrik refers to Thailand's fish sauce with thinly sliced Phrik Khi Nu and a squeeze of lime, sometimes sliced garlic is added, too. This sauce complements fried fish and fried rice dishes, but it is used universally as a more sophisticated substitute for plain fish sauce. Prik Ki Nu is also known as birds eye chilis, birdshit chilis , scuds, dynamite chilis, or "mouse dropping" or mouse shit chili. These Thai chilis are viciously hot and are widely used in Thai cuisine. They form the basis for most Nam Prik recipes.

Nam Phrik Siracha refers to Thailand's thick, orange chilli sauce made from red chilli, vinegar and sugar. It can be bought in Bottles at the markets. It is used as a sauce and a dip for seafood.

Nam Jim Kai refers to Thailand's multi - purpose dip which is predominantly sweet in taste. Sugar forms the base, but fish sauce , garlic and red chilli round out the flavor. It complements barbecued chicken, skewered pork, grilled cuttlefish, fried wanton, spring rolls or batter fried shrimp. There are other variations to this sweet dip. If cucumber slices, crushed peanuts and a bit of vinegar are added, the dip is used with fried bean curd and fried fish cakes.