Glossary U

The food glossary +++ 'Unagiya / Unagi Ya', 'Usus Ayam', 'Umutsima'

Uruli is the Malayalam name of a traditional and special pot for cooking Payasam, particularly Semiya Payasam in Kerala, India. 

Picture below shows, Aunt Lilly cooking Semiya Payasam in Uruli.

Uppu Manga also spelled Uppumanga refers to whole  or slices of  tender raw green mangoes immersed in a salt solution and stored safely in a Bharani, a traditional earthenware pot or ceramic jar which can be used later for various purposes, such as for making Curries, Chutneys and Pickles. 

Moreover, Uppu Manga refers to salt-brined raw mangoes or raw mangoes in brine. In Kerala, India, Uppu Manga is made from slices of tender raw mangoes then preserved by immersing them in a salt solution. If the mangoes are well brined/ preserved they can last until a year. 

It is said that Uppu Manga eaten with  Kanthari Mulaku (bird’s eye chilies) and Kanji  is one of Malayali's  favorite comfort food.

My friend in Allepey, Kerala, eat them straight from the jar or eat them sometimes with Kanji (rice porridge/gruel). I tasted my first Uppu Manga during my first meal (lunch) in Allepey as a side dish.

Unakka Nangu Varuthathu is one of the dried fish dishes from Kerala, India that refers to salted dried fish fry. Unakka Nangu Varuthathu is made by frying the dried Malabar Sole in Coconut oil with red chilies, chili powder and curry leaves , then with slices of onions until golden brown.

Fish is very common in Kerala, being a state near the sea and is the most favorite food of most of the people of Kerala. It is cooked in different ways, including preparing them as dried fish (Unakkameen)  which can also be used and cooked in many different ways. 

Nangu is the Malayalam word for Malabar Sole.

Please see below the picture of Unakka Nangu Varuthathu or dried Malabar Sole fish fry

Below is a complete meal for dinner in Allepey, Kerala, India composed of Kanji, Cherupayaru Olarthiyathu and Unakka Nangu Varuthathu

 

 

Unakka Chemmeen Varuthathu refers to Dried Prawns/Shrimps Fry, one of the many dishes using dried seafoods in Kerala, India. 

Unakka Chemmeen Varuthathu is made by frying Unakka Chemmeen in Coconut oil with onions, spices, such as red chili powder and Curry leaves until the dried shrimps and the onions are crispy and golden brown.

Chemmeen is the Malayalam word for Shrimps or Prawns. Unakka Chemmeen means "salted dried Shrimps/Prawns".

Dried Shrimps are called Hibi or Hibe in the Philippines, the only difference is that Hibi/Hibe are made of shrimps which are dried without its shells, while the Unakka Chemmeen from Kerala have their shells still intact when dried so when they are fried, they turn crispy.

Below is a picture of Unakka Chemmeen being fried by my friend in her traditional kitchen in Allepey, Kerala, India

 

Unakka Nangu Olarthiyathu means Dried Malabar Sole stir-fry. It is one of the varieties of preparation of dried fish in Kerala, India. Unakka Nangu Olarthiyathu is made by stir-frying the dried Malabar Sole is slices of onions, spiced with turmeric powder, Kadugu (black Mustard seeds), ginger, chilies and curry leaves

Unakka Nangu is the Malayalam term for dried Malabar Sole.

Unakka Nangu Olarthiyathu is also spelled Unakka Nangu Ularthiyathu.

Pictures below was the Unakka Nangu Olarthiyathu prepared by my family friend from Allepey, Kerala, India.

 

Unakka Aiyla is the Malayalam, term for dried Mackarel/Mackerel (fish), one of the many dried varieties of fish available in Kerala, India.

Aiyla is the Malayalam word for Mackarel/Mackerel. Unakkameen is the generic term for "dried fish" in Malayalam, the language of the state of Kerala

In Tamil, dried fish is called Karuvadu.

The picture below is fried Unakka Aiyla in Coconut Oil to be serve for dinner with steamed rice and Curry.